Related: Adirondack Chronicles

Adirondack Chronicles 2012.4

 
 

Cycles of life become very obvious when observing wildlife habits.  Many wild creatures are quite predictable when it comes to mating and nesting.  Osprey, for example, tend to mate for life and return to the same next each spring to hatch their new chicks:

I have watched this particular Osprey nest for at least the last decade.  It’s high on a telephone pole near Lake Champlain in the middle of a field in Crown Point.

I have found a new brood of brown ducks every year along the banks of Stony Creek…

Eating is the major activity for most ducklings…

Speaking of eating, this loon seems to be testing the rule “never eat a fish bigger than your head”…

Meanwhile, meandering along the Raquette River I heard a lot of noise and came upon this common merganser and her brood racing along the river bank…

As I rounded the bend I saw that an approaching canoe sparked this great race…

The mergansers also seem to be raising their broods in the same places along the Raquette river bank each year…

This frog just sat there daring me to come one stroke closer…. it was such a nice day I guess he didn’t want to bother leaping back into the water…

And this curious chipmunk seemed to welcome a staring contest…

More to come…  the weather is great up here (sorry about that, Washington!)….

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Patricia A. McGuire, President, Trinity, 125 Michigan Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20017
Phone: 202.884.9050   Email: president@trinitydc.edu